Thursday, July 24, 2014

$PEAK OUT


The light of George

Wednesday, July 23, 2014

A not so sure George


(I got the Millay check today, after waiting for it this past month. I can't help to think that it was meant to come this particular day.)

I want to track it's spending, the first three dollars go to the following;
 Diane Jacob's project $PEAK OUT:

The staggering statistic that around the world at least 1 woman in every 3 has been beaten, coerced into sex or otherwise abused in her lifetime requires us to act. 

$PEAK OUT is about engaging the public to respond to this crisis and ending the silence. Through outreach, people from all walks of life will participate and react to these atrocities with their voices on their money. This act of transforming individual statements and drawings into a collective artwork is compelling. The power is in the numbers, yet what touches the heart is each handwritten expression. Money buys inequality, injustice, and violence. Money procures policy-making and military action. Money captures attention.
 
The goal for $PEAK OUT is to generate a paradigm shift. Imagine thousands, hundreds of thousands, a million - even a billion’s worth of bills hung on austere white museum walls, in university galleries, and community public spaces. Massive displays of money generate a visceral reaction. At closer inspection, individual messages are revealed. The work is unified by the continuity of material and method. Each personalized script is precisely cut. 


Tuesday, July 22, 2014

Anitra


You, madam, are the point

whatisthepointvideo from Tereza Swanda on Vimeo.

I love you, dear soul. Rest in peace.

Wednesday, July 16, 2014

my stain and participation, blue to red




Impermanent foundation


This was the house I called home. I spent hours observing every slug and snail in the yard. I climbed the cherry tree at the edge of the property and picked forest strawberries on the side of the house while regular berries had a devoted plot in the back.We played with a marble on the winding staircase between the floors, to the great dismay of our grandmother who worried about someone slipping on the glass ball. (No-one ever did.) I can describe in detail the furniture in every room on that top floor that now the air flows through. 

This building was built by the Germans in the war. It has a vantage point of overlooking the town in the valley. My grandfather (by marriage) acquired this house for his good service after the war. He had enormous scar along the edge of his belly. It cut into his round flesh right along his ribs. My grandmother acquired him after both had devoted themselves to others, had children, but were reunited in their forties, too old to have children of their own. He rocked me on his knees and I thought I had his blue eyes, not yet knowing the lineage. (I didn't look into my fathers eyes to discover the blueness there.)

The building was leveled last week. 


MVI 4811 from Tereza Swanda on Vimeo.

Friday, July 11, 2014

Our Red Books

Our red books
Two Aspects Of The Same Thing In The Same Space
Oil, Pencil, Paper on Canvas
48" x 60"
Studio walls and table
24/7, 365
Used dishtowels stretched over wood
8" x 8" each
Working on creating one for each day, each meal, each day
24/7, 365 detail
Used dishtowels stretched over wood
8" x 8" each

studio wall
Possible sketches for larger porcelain pieces

studio wall

Speak With The Hand (After Tapies)



Thursday, July 10, 2014

questioning the forefathers


Questioning the spikes of this forefather
(That strange ruffle is in almost every painting,etching of him)

Also which was his right side?
The dollar bill seems to be just a horizontal flip of his paintings- thus:


(Always with Anitra on my mind and her flipped Mandelas)

Creating soaps of our forefathers, to be installed for use in public restrooms.


Tuesday, July 8, 2014

reveiwing Montessori

Preparation for human society is based on the activities of children who act, urged on by the needs of their nature, in a limited world corresponding to the frame.

Monday, July 7, 2014

Conclusions (from Millay) and the Beginning


1.                                                                                                                                 



2.                                                                                                                                 



3.                                                                            



4.                                                                           



5.                                                                                                                               



6.                                                                                                                               



7.                                                                                                                              


1.      Untitled, (Girl Within)
 Unfired clay on plaster, 2014
 Housedress on US flag, 2008

2.     Untitled, (Girl)
My daughter’s left over banana stubs and cleaning rag over clay bust, 2014

3.     Untitled (Mutual Cleanse)
Carved and painted soap, washed, 2011-present

4.     Untitled (Objects)
Gauze, 2011

5.     Remains
Sumi ink and shell in jar lid, washed, 2012

6.     Shells
Spoon in glove of easel, 2012
Oxide on egg shell, 1998-present

7.     Unstable (Us, Them)
Unfired clay in water, 2014
Oil on canvas and wall, 2001


Sunday, July 6, 2014

launched my website!
mamatereza.net

Sunday, June 29, 2014


Letting the rain wash away her scream

And she only sleeps when it's raining
And she screams and her voice is strained...



Saturday, June 28, 2014

Unstable Foundation

Ani's direct presence, present, a present


Thursday, June 26, 2014

dream

We are at sea level and see a tsunami coming. We run hand in hand up to higher ground. Others have not yet seen the large wave. We get higher and higher. I know we will be safe even as the tip of the wave might get us wet. I know I will hold my mother's hand even if we go under water.

After, we see a couple completely oblivious to the situation sitting in a cafe.

Monday, June 23, 2014

In Light, reflection

In reviewing my work this past month, I notice and create an a. angry mark, b. the girl trapped within the man, and c. the fold of the fabric expresses more the content than the face itself.

a.

b.

c.

 I also notice how very few of the heads see with eyes open. It is a reflection of working from digital imagery where the eyes are mere shadow. On another level, I am feeling my way, just like the woman blind-folded, in the image of Automatic Writing. Sometimes, it is not the eyes that sees; for example, feeling my infant startle on my back as a crescendo comes on pandora and pierces his nap, I lower the volume. 

Sunday, June 22, 2014

In Light Of


this virtual residency,

the Carl Andre exhibit I just experienced,
all of a sudden missing Ana Mendieta more,
searching for the 50 Steps exercise, which I just found after looking for it for over 2 hours, after
finding so many notes, articles, letters from workshops from 1996 onward (!), I am totally overwhelmed and also totally energized. I realized this weekend that I haven't necessarily taken my studio practice that seriously, and have not truly fulfilled my own potential as an artist. This isn't a self judgment; I can see it in my work. 
How can I change this? 
What can I throw away? 
What can I keep? 
Do I believe in what I'm doing?
What are my references? 
What am I studying? 
Why am I an artist? 
What am I commenting on? 
What do I want to say?

Neil Postman came to mind, especially The End Of Education. So I looked him up to find out more about his work. I didn't realize he helped craft the Inquiry Method for teaching and learning. So interesting!


From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
  (Redirected from Teaching as a Subversive Activity)
Inquiry education (sometimes known as the inquiry method) is a student-centered method of education focused on asking questions. Students are encouraged to ask questions which are meaningful to them, and which do not necessarily have easy answers; teachers are encouraged to avoid giving answers when this is possible, and in any case to avoid giving direct answers in favor of asking more questions. The method was advocated by Neil Postman and Charles Weingartner in their book Teaching as a Subversive Activity.
The inquiry method is motivated by Postman and Weingartner's recognition that good learners and sound reasoners center their attention and activity on the dynamic process of inquiry itself, not merely on the end product of static knowledge. They write that certain characteristics are common to all good learners (Postman and Weingartner, 31–33), saying that all good learners have:
  • Self-confidence in their learning ability
  • Pleasure in problem solving
  • A keen sense of relevance
  • Reliance on their own judgment over other people's or society's
  • No fear of being wrong
  • No haste in answering
  • Flexibility in point of view
  • Respect for facts, and the ability to distinguish between fact and opinion
  • No need for final answers to all questions, and comfort in not knowing an answer to difficult questions rather than settling for a simplistic answer
In an attempt to instill students with these qualities and behaviors, a teacher adhering to the inquiry method in pedagogy must behave very differently from a traditional teacher. Postman and Weingartner suggest that inquiry teachers have the following characteristics (pp. 34–37):
  • They avoid telling students what they "ought to know".
  • They talk to students mostly by questioning, and especially by asking divergent questions.
  • They do not accept short, simple answers to questions.
  • They encourage students to interact directly with one another, and avoid judging what is said in student interactions.
  • They do not summarize students' discussion.
  • They do not plan the exact direction of their lessons in advance, and allow it to develop in response to students' interests.
  • Their lessons pose problems to students.
  • They gauge their success by change in students' inquiry behaviors (with the above characteristics of "good learners" as a goal).

References[edit]

  • Postman, Neil, and Weingartner, Charles (1969), Teaching as a Subversive Activity, Dell, New York, NY.

Further reading[edit]

  • Awbrey, Jon, and Awbrey, Susan (1995), "Interpretation as Action: The Risk of Inquiry", Inquiry: Critical Thinking Across the Disciplines 15, 40-52.Eprint

Yesterday, today

Yesterday 
-2 year old birthday party from 9-11am
-Met M and C at Carl Andre exhibition at Dia: Beacon.
-Opening reception of Worlds Of Wonder at the Dorsky Museum.

The Dia exhibit was incredible, intense, all-encompassing, expansive, quiet, powerful, and captivating.

However, I never knew the back story that Andre was charged and later acquitted of murdering his wife, the artist Ana Mendieta. A book was written about it five years after the incident. From the NYTimes: NAKED BY THE WINDOW: The Fatal Marriage of Carl Andre and Ana Mendieta, by Robert Katz.

Apparently this retrospective was protested by many artists in front of Dia in NYC, via Hyperallergic, here.

Knowing this about Andre, how is my reception of his work changed?
Does it effect how I understand his work?
How does it effect his contribution to art history?
I mean, to me it appears that he's made a bi-forked contribution: his own work to Minimalism over a 40 year career and that story..and also (potentially, allegedly) removing Mendieta from the story of art and Feminism and silencing her potential growth and development as an artist.

I only learned about Andre and Mendieta after returning from the opening at the Dorsky.
The show was good, well attended and well received. Some of the artists spoke about their work. I admire the curator's approach. C and M stayed for a while. I'm still interested to see how my piece develops, where the tableaus can go, what they are, and what I can learn from them.

Here are some images of my piece from the opening, thanks to Ruth Burkett




We were all exhausted after a 12 hour day, and fell asleep soon after eating ice cream cones on the front porch.

Today
I'm ordering the book about Mendieta and Andre. I want to know more.


clarifying


Alenka's title "Oyster being born"

In 1998 I had a dream. Living abroad in Florence, IT, it was the year President Clinton was bombing Kosovo, just across the Adriatic Sea. I dreamt I solved the War, and not just that particular War but all wars. It was simple. The solution was to float photos down all rivers to the area of conflict. When soldiers realized their so called enemies were depicted in the images, and recognized themselves in the images, they would have to put their weapons down. One would recognize the humanity in the other.  

I question my notions of the other, male-female, brother-mother, victim-perpetrator, husband-wife. I enact violence, serenity, softness, a harsh rub, whatever the moment calls for. I communicate that, as accurately as I can and with great empathy. Material is left impermanent, as is all ground, philosophical or topographical. Installations shift within the context of each space. Each portrait’s presence/present, captured in a momentary stasis, responds to the marks of the wall, and the size of the space allotted. 



Saturday, June 21, 2014

Automatic Writing


I was about to include this in my package to you just yesterday but something made me stick it to my pin-up's wall. I still need to look at it. (When looking up pin-ups the other day I realized they were just a visual reflection of what one is thinking about. What a different mind set!)

I found this image in the VSC library and was compelled to make a copy. 

Friday, June 20, 2014

Tove Storch

Someone just shared this residency in Marfa.
Looked interesting, so I decided to look at past artists' work.

Found this artist, Tove Storch. Really love the simplicity and beauty of her work in blue, here.
Reading of performance here

Such a nice discovery today
x




Thursday, June 19, 2014

Kara Walker


William Kentridge on his process


Looking at Looking at Your Questions


Can you be more specific when you say "subtle struggle" of living in a patriarchal world? How are you struggling specifically? Do you really feel that oppressed? 
Yes, I feel defined/confined from the outside, especially in the term, the role, mother. (Most often by my family.) Other times by the situations that do not allow for children (working mothers) in their space. 

What if there is no "outside", no "inside"...?
Could it be that you are dealing with family structure issues in relation to your own identity, and perhaps that's where you are feeling most confined? Also, why are you letting this role "define" you? I understand that your time at the VSC residency was less than ideal, but are there other environments where you would feel more supported in terms of bringing your children with you to work? And if not, why are you letting someone else's structure get under your skin like this? Is there something deeper that you may need to address...?

-What qualities about Nancy Spero's work do you identify with, and how are you actually protesting? How is leaving the sculptures on the ground a protest? 
I identify with her severed heads, her empathy and accuracy of emotion within those tiny heads that she did in response to the Vietnam war, seeing those media images of that war for the first time. 

empathy and accuracy of emotion ... those are really wonderful qualities in one's work. But perhaps she's pointing at the moon and you're looking at her finger...? Could there be another way to incorporate the empathy and accuracy of emotion, but translate into your own vocabulary...? I mean, if you're wanting to get angry, then get ANGRY and let that guide you. Look at Kara Walker, etc...

-What does your grandfather's molds have to do with Nigerian women exactly? What's the connection there?

I want to change patriarchy, one mold at a time, have my grandfather- who is just a stand in representative of patriarchy (although the reality was that he was the one who was gentle and kind throughout my childhood, and my grandmother who was the dictator.) But I want the definition of genders to shift. Patriarchy is passes on from thousands of generations.

Why do you want the definition of genders to shift?
A definition is just a man-made word that people agree has meaning.
It has no power over anything. If the idea of women's roles, or your role in particular in relation to Patriarchal hierarchy, is something that upsets you and you want to speak about, could it be that easy to just work from there? It seems like the way you are living your life with your husband and family is an excellent model of progressive living - outside of ascribed gender roles - that perhaps that naturalness could be conveyed through your work as well...?

The Greek general Meno wrote:
Let us take first the virtue of a man—he should know how to administer the state, and in the administration of it to benefit his friends and harm his enemies; and he must also be careful not to suffer harm himself. A woman's virtue, if you wish to know about that, may also be easily described: her duty is to order her house, and keep what is indoors, and obey her husband.”

That pisses me off as well. And I'm Greek, so that is literally part of my heritage. I found that statement to be true when I visited my family there for the first time when I was 15. It was during that summer when I knew I was a feminist without knowing that the term "feminst" was. I just knew that that structure of oppression of women was NOT OK. Years later, I read the book WET, which helped deconstruct a lot of ... everything really regarding gender roles and the history of  gender-based language that "we" take for granted. It might be a good read for you too.

It is this mentality that binds the Nigerian girls today.

All of us are responsible for perpetuating "this mentality".
It's like that saying: we are the problem and we are the solution.

-Why is it important to highlight the method of documentation? Why is enlarging the images important to you? What about impermanence gives you hope, and what does that have to do with protesting patriarchy?

The idea of impermanence is crucial as it means that patriarchy cannot do anything but change. 

Exactly. Everything changes, decomposes, transforms. If this is an aspect that gives you hope, how can you work with it in relation to how angry the situation makes you? Can you work from a transformative place? 

The enlargement means that the girls receive the presence they deserve. 
I understand what you are saying...but to me, your statement feels like you're speaking for others. "receive the presence they deserve"...do you really mean you'd like to recapture a presence that you think you deserve, and are using the Nigerian women as a vehicle or metaphor for what you want for yourself? I'm trying to figure out what's really going on here.... If you need to be angry, then get angry and communicate that with empathy and accuracy of emotion. The statement feels like you're wanting to speak about something HUGE and not realizing that your own story might be the biggest gold you can ever wish for. I would encourage you to keep going with this, figure it out by working more and more and more. You may be working on a 3D mind map via this piece - keep it going! I'm so curious to see what comes next

Automatic Writing - William Kentridge


Wednesday, June 18, 2014

Natural Breakdown

Looking at your questions:

Can you be more specific when you say "subtle struggle" of living in a patriarchal world? How are you struggling specifically? Do you really feel that oppressed? 
Yes, I feel defined/confined from the outside, especially in the term, the role, mother. (Most often by my family.) Other times by the situations that do not allow for children (working mothers) in their space.

-What qualities about Nancy Spero's work do you identify with, and how are you actually protesting? How is leaving the sculptures on the ground a protest? 
I identify with her severed heads, her empathy and accuracy of emotion within those tiny heads that she did in response to the Vietnam war, seeing those media images of that war for the first time.

-What does your grandfather's molds have to do with Nigerian women exactly? What's the connection there?

I want to change patriarchy, one mold at a time, have my grandfather- who is just a stand in representative of patriarchy (although the reality was that he was the one who was gentle and kind throughout my childhood, and my grandmother who was the dictator.) But I want the definition of genders to shift. Patriarchy is passes on from thousands of generations.
The Greek general Meno wrote:
Let us take first the virtue of a man—he should know how to administer the state, and in the administration of it to benefit his friends and harm his enemies; and he must also be careful not to suffer harm himself. A woman's virtue, if you wish to know about that, may also be easily described: her duty is to order her house, and keep what is indoors, and obey her husband.”
It is this mentality that binds the Nigerian girls today.

-Why is it important to highlight the method of documentation? Why is enlarging the images important to you? What about impermanence gives you hope, and what does that have to do with protesting patriarchy?


The idea of impermanence is crucial as it means that patriarchy cannot do anything but change. The enlargement means that the girls receive the presence they deserve. 


I realize:
I look at the expressions of the perpetrator/s



and break them slowly and naturally down.

A not so sure Aristotle.
bounty on one's head